By: Stacie Sullivan


Photo by Aaron Blatt


Heading out on any great adventure requires some level of training, whether it’s working toward marathon goals, or climbing a distant peak that we’ve had our eyes set on. As outdoors people, we put a lot of time and energy into training not only to reach our goals, but do so with the right level of tools and preparedness. As we gear up for the upcoming election cycle, let’s treat midterm elections with the same importance. Midterms Matter. Let’s make sure we have the right education and tools to boost our confidence and send it to the polls this coming November.

The 2022 midterm elections will play an important role in American politics, and they offer us all the chance to vote for what we believe in—but we can’t make systemic change happen alone. As members of the Outdoor State let’s rally together and vote for candidates that will protect the outdoor spaces we love. In 2018 we saw the highest voter turnout in history, with 49.4% of the voting-eligible population showing up to the voting booths. It’s critical that we keep the momentum flowing, and we believe that the POW community has what it takes to inspire others to take action, vote and challenge the long-standing incumbents. 

Addressing the climate crisis requires action from the federal government, and in order to make climate policy a top priority in DC, we need to elect champions for issues that voters care about. That means showing up to the polls and creating a healthy, representative democracy. This includes engaging individuals who live in rural communities in states like Colorado, Utah, Nevada, Arizona and Montana where POW has worked extensively.

2018 Midterm Voter Turnout
Photo by Donny O’Neill

As people who recreate in the outdoors, we understand that having safe adventures can come down to the tiniest of margins. A millimeter can mean the difference between grabbing ahold of a crimp on a big wall or taking a fall. The same concept can be applied in elections, especially in these smaller communities. Local elections are often decided by a much smaller group of voters, which is why it’s so important that the people who live in these places feel educated and empowered to use their vote.

Candidates often ignore rural communities since major voter pools are in more densely populated areas reducing the likelihood of showing up to vote. However, the people in these communities are often on the front lines of climate impacts whether it’s in agriculture, water supplies or access to the outdoor areas in and around their homes. A vote for climate is a vote to help protect these communities we live and play in. 

We have strength in numbers, and as a member of the Outdoor State, that sum includes you. We are 50 million-plus strong, so imagine the power we could have if we all voted together? No matter where we are, where we live, work or play, it’s time to take a stand for what we believe in. This is when we have the chance to choose the candidates who make it onto the ballot in the 2024 primary election and help move the needle toward a clean energy future. 

POW is here to make voting easy for you. Consider us your backcountry guides leading you to the top of Midterm Mountain. Choose action over apathy and pledge to vote! You’ll be able to check your voter registration status, update your registration and keep up-to-date on all of the critical dates associated with your state. After you pledge to vote, help us spread the movement by sharing why you’re voting on social media with us by tagging @protectourwinters, #dropinandvote, #stokethevote and #stokethevote2022.  

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Stacie Sullivan

Author: Stacie Sullivan

Stacie always knew she wanted to pursue a career in the ski industry from a young age, having first clicked into skis at the age of 4 and writing her 8th grade career project on being a professional skier. While her dreams of becoming a professional athlete didn’t quite pan out the way she planned at […]